Start Professional black women dating blue collar men

Professional black women dating blue collar men

As read in a Circus magazine (or the like) of the time, the song was composed by Tommy Shaw after hearing the sound of his motor boat engine when it failed to start, making the riff of the song.

"Raymond was definitely in a class by himself in every way," said Odette Duggan, 48, a Department of Education manager, whose husband, Raymond, is a maintenance worker. "When I said he should consider buying a tux, he was like, 'Okay, let's go get a tux.' He was moldable." Given that women's education levels and career achievements have surpassed those of men in some key areas, it's not surprising that they are finding fewer available mates among their social peers.

Add to that, recent research, confirming what women have long suspected -- that men are threatened by their success. "They weren't caring, and they weren't nice." Odette and Raymond Duggan have been married for 15 years and live in East Harlem with their two daughters, Faith, 12, and Isabella, 10.

I work with a guy who was telling me that his sister met a really nice guy whom she felt instant atraction to. I work with a guy who was telling me that his sister met a really nice guy whom she felt instant atraction to.

"If I were to marry a type-A personality and we sat on our computers side by side in the evenings, I think I'd die," she says. The last thing I want is to go home to an investment banker." Despite their job disparities, the couple share enjoyment of the opera and theater.

When they attend her upscale corporate events, she isn't embarrassed when people ask about her husband's profession.

He also seemed, well, Forget the old notion of "marrying up." As baby boomer women advance in the workplace, they are broadening their field of available suitors by pairing up with blue-collar men who seem less threatened by their success and independence.

"A lot of contemporary women in the workforce are getting tired of a certain competitiveness and ambitiousness of men who are very successful, and are finding blue-collar men to be refreshing, more direct, and possibly offering more communication and more attention," said Elyse Goldstein, 62, a Manhattan psychologist whose husband worked in the fuel-oil industry. They have a sense that they're not the princes of the universe.

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